Log in

Study Skills English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

Published on October 7th, 2018 | Last updated on September 3rd, 2020 by | Category: English Vocabulary in Context | No Comments on Study Skills English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL | 106 Views | Reading Time: 10 minutes

Study Skills English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

Study Skills English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

The Outline of This Lesson on Study Skills English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

Source: Wikipedia

Study Skills

Study skills, academic skills, or study strategies are approaches applied to learning. They are generally critical to success in school, considered essential for acquiring good grades, and useful for learning throughout one’s life.

Study skills are an array of skills which tackle((deal with – face)) the process of organizing and taking in((learning – grasping – absorbing)) new information, retaining information, or dealing with assessments. They include mnemonics, which aid the retention of lists of information; effective reading; concentration techniques; and efficient note-taking.

While often left up to the student and their support network, study skills are increasingly taught in high school and at the university level.

More broadly, any skill which boosts a person’s ability to study, retain and recall((bring back – remember)) information which assists in and passing exams can be termed((called – named)) a study skill, and this could include time management and motivational techniques.

Study skills are discrete techniques that can be learned, usually in a short time, and applied to all or most fields of study. They must therefore be distinguished from strategies that are specific to a particular field of study (e.g. music or technology), and from abilities inherent in the student, such as aspects of intelligence or learning styles.

What is cramming?

In educationcramming is the practice of working intensively to absorb((take in – learn)) large volumes of informational material in short amounts of time. It is often done by students in preparation for upcoming exams, especially just before they are due((expected)). Usually the student’s priority is to obtain shallow recall suited to a superficial examination protocol, rather than to internalize the deep structure of the subject matter. Cramming is often discouraged by educators because the hurried coverage of material tends to result in poor long-term retention of material, a phenomenon often referred to as the spacing effect. Despite this, educators nevertheless widely persist in the use of superficial examination protocols, because these questions are easier to compose, quicker (and therefore cheaper for the institution) to grade, and objective on their own terms. When cramming, one attempts to focus only on studies and to forgo unnecessary actions or habits.

Skimming and Scanning

Skimming is a process of speed reading that involves visually searching the sentences of a page for clues to the main idea or when reading an essay, it can mean reading the beginning and ending for summary information, then optionally the first sentence of each paragraph to quickly determine whether to seek still more detail, as determined by the questions or purpose of the reading. For some people, this comes naturally, but is usually acquired((obtained – attained)) by practice. Skimming is usually seen more in adults than in children. It is conducted at a higher rate (700 words per minute and above) than normal reading for comprehension (around 200–230 wpm), and results in((ends in – leads to)) lower comprehension rates, especially with information-rich reading material. Scanning is the process where one actively looks for((searches for)) information using a mind-map (organizing information in a visually hierarchical manner that showcases the interrelatedness of the information for better retrievability) formed from skimming. These techniques are used by meta-guiding your eyes. Scanning includes the main point as well as headings and important information.


Instructions

  • Source: Noun
    "source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
    2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>Source: embedded videos, selected texts, or assigned coursebooks
  • Study the assigned Source: Noun
    "source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
    2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>source and "writeWrite down (phrasal verb)
    to note or jot down something using a notepad and pen or pencil:
    Let me write down your telephone number in case.“>write down the  points that are mentioned or explained in this lesson in the "InteractiveInteractive (adj)
    /ˌɪn.təˈræk.tɪv/ US /-ţɚ-/ involving communication or interaction among the people in a system or group – collaborative – communicative: In our online English forums, the students can practice English in an interactive way by raising and answering questions.“>interactive "CommentComment (noun & verb)
    /ˈkɒm.ent/ US /ˈkɑː.ment/ your opinion that you say or write in a particular context – viewpoint – point of view: On LELB Society, you can leave as many questions or comments as you wish in our interactive forums.“>comment form below.
  • You can make any examples of the discussed vocabulary items and leave them as comments.
  • You are also encouraged to add further explanations or examples about the current Topic: Noun
    "topic/ˈtɒp.ɪk/ US /ˈtɑː.pɪk/ noun [C] a subject which is discussed, written about or studied: Our discussion ranged over various topics, such as acid rain and the hole in the ozone layer.“>topic as long as they are related.

Study the complete archive of English Vocabulary.

Watch this video on YouTube.

Leave a Comment

Chat