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Establishing Relationships English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

Published on October 13th, 2018 | Last updated on September 3rd, 2020 by | Category: English Vocabulary in Context | No Comments on Establishing Relationships English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL | 103 Views | Reading Time: 17 minutes

Establishing Relationships English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

Establishing Relationships English Vocabulary for IELTS and TOEFL

The Outline of This Lesson on Establishing Relationships English Vocabulary for 

IELTS
"IELTSThe International English Language Testing System or IELTS /ˈ.ɛlts/, is an international standardized test of English language proficiency for non-native English language speakers. It is jointly managed by the British Council, IDP: IELTS Australia and Cambridge English Language Assessment, and was established in 1989. IELTS is one of the major English-language tests in the world, others being the TOEFL, TOEIC and OPI/OPIc.
IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training are designed to cover the full range of ability from non-user to expert user. The Academic version is for test takers who want to study at tertiary level in an English-speaking country or seek professional registration. The General Training version is for test takers who want to work, train, study at a secondary school or migrate to an English-speaking country.
 “>IELTS and TOEFL
: Noun
"TOEFL/ˈtəʊ.fļ/ US /ˈtoʊ-/ noun [U] TRADEMARK ABBREVIATION FOR test of English as a foreign language: an exam of English for speakers of other languages”>TOEFL

What is a relationship?

Source: Noun
"source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>Source: www.wikihow.com

Human beings are social creatures, and most of us yearn for close relationships with other people. Relationships require a lot of work and a lot of communication, but it can still be hard to understand what the other person is thinking. This article can help you figure out where you stand in a romantic relationship with another person. It can also help you understand the types of relationships as well as help you know the signs of a healthy relationship of any kind.

What is rapport?

Source: Noun
"source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>Source: www.wikipedia.org

Rapport is a close and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups concerned are “in sync” with each other, understand each other’s feelings or ideas, and communicate smoothly.

There are a number of techniques that are supposed to be beneficial in building rapport such as: matching your body language (i.e., posture, gesture, etc.); indicating attentiveness through maintaining eye contact; and matching breathing rhythm. In conversation, some verbal behaviors associated with increased rapport are the use of positivity (or, positive “face management”), sharing personal information of gradually increasing intimacy (or, “self-disclosure”), and by referring to shared interests or experiences.

Rapport has been shown to have benefits for psychotherapy and medicine, negotiation, and education, among others. In each of these cases, the rapport between members of a dyad (e.g. a teacher and student or doctor and patient) allows the participants to coordinate their actions and establish a mutually beneficial working relationship, or what is often called a “working alliance”.

Interpersonal Relationships

An interpersonal relationship is a strong, deep, or close association or acquaintance between two or more people that may range in duration from brief to enduring. This association may be based on inference, love, solidarity, regular business interactions, or some other type of social commitment. Interpersonal relationships thrive through equitable and reciprocal compromise, they are formed in the context of social, cultural and other influences. The context can vary from family or kinship relations, friendship, marriage, relations with associates((colleagues)), work, clubs, neighborhoods, and the like. They may be regulated by law, custom, or mutual agreement, and are the basis of social groups and society as a whole.

Engagement Period

An engagement, betrothal, or fiancer is a promise to wed, and also the period of time between a marriage proposal and a marriage. Being engaged is not the same as dating. During this period, a couple is said to be betrothed, intendedaffiancedengaged to be married, or simply engaged. Future brides and grooms may be called the betrothed, a wife-to-be or husband-to-befiancée or fiancé (from the French word of the same form), respectively. The duration of the courtship varies vastly, and is largely dependent on cultural norms or upon the agreement of the parties involved.

Breaking up with Your Lover

Source: Noun
"source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>Source: www.goop.com

The dissolution of any romantic relationship is invariably painful: At its worst, it is devastating and harmful and leaves a lot of emotional collateral damage in its wake; at its best, it’s done with tenderness and care, and both parties put aside a desire to just be done with it in favor of taking the time to separate with patience and love. The latter is difficult to achieve, but ultimately a more expedient path to peace.


Instructions

  • Source: Noun
    "source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
    2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>Source: embedded videos, selected texts, or assigned coursebooks
  • Study the assigned Source: Noun
    "source/sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ noun [C] 1. the place something comes from or starts at, or the cause of something: a source of heat/energy/light Oranges are a good source of vitamin C. Money is often a source of tension and disagreements in young married couples.
    2. someone or something that supplies information: The journalist refused to reveal her sources (= say who had given the information to her). According to Government sources (= people in the Government) many MPs are worried about this issue. source /sɔːs/ US /sɔːrs/ verb [T often passive] to get something from a particular place: Where possible the produce used in our restaurant is sourced locally.“>source and "writeWrite down (phrasal verb)
    to note or jot down something using a notepad and pen or pencil:
    Let me write down your telephone number in case.“>write down the  points that are mentioned or explained in this lesson in the "InteractiveInteractive (adj)
    /ˌɪn.təˈræk.tɪv/ US /-ţɚ-/ involving communication or interaction among the people in a system or group – collaborative – communicative: In our online English forums, the students can practice English in an interactive way by raising and answering questions.“>interactive "CommentComment (noun & verb)
    /ˈkɒm.ent/ US /ˈkɑː.ment/ your opinion that you say or write in a particular context – viewpoint – point of view: On LELB Society, you can leave as many questions or comments as you wish in our interactive forums.“>comment form below.
  • You can make any examples of the discussed vocabulary items and leave them as comments.
  • You are also encouraged to add further explanations or examples about the current Topic: Noun
    "topic/ˈtɒp.ɪk/ US /ˈtɑː.pɪk/ noun [C] a subject which is discussed, written about or studied: Our discussion ranged over various topics, such as acid rain and the hole in the ozone layer.“>topic as long as they are related.

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