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English Idioms on Feelings and Emotions

Published on September 21st, 2018 | Last updated on September 3rd, 2020 by | Category: English Vocabulary in Context | 13 Comments on English Idioms on Feelings and Emotions | 136 Views | Reading Time: 3 minutes

English Idioms on Feelings

English Idioms on Feelings


Be on cloud nine

to be very happy about something

It was a lovely journey across Europe and they were on cloud nine.


Bent out of shape

very angry or upset

He was bent out of shape over the way his boss treated him.


Work like a dream
To work or go extremely well, without any problems
He let me drive his new car last night – it goes like a dream.

Up and running
Functioning properly
As soon as we can get the tractor up and running, we will plant the corn crop.

Fall into place
1: If parts of a situation that you have been trying to understand fall into place, you start to understand how they are connected with each other.
Suddenly, all details started falling into place.
2: If parts of something that you want to happen fall into place, they start to happen in a way that you want.
I was lucky because everything fell into place at exactly the right time.

Looking up
If a situation is looking up, it is improving and getting better.
In this season everything is looking up.

Oh, no! That’s all we needed

to indicate that the situation is even worse that expected

I’m already late and now I’ve got a flat tire. Oh, no! That’s all I needed. 

Be like a bad dream

referring to a series of bad events or accidents

Now that I desperately need to work on my thesis, the computer is broken. This is like a bad dream.

A real nightmare

explaining a situation when things are going wrong

It’s a real nightmare to have to pass this difficult course, which is all useless.

What a pain

referring to a problematic situation

The children had made such a mess at home, and I have to clean up everything. What a pain!


Spaced out

not concentrating on what is happening around you because of tiredness or drugs

Jim was totally spaced out after cleaning and ordering the carpentry workshop.


Instructions

  • Source: embedded videos, selected texts, or assigned coursebooks
  • Study the assigned source and write down the English idioms and expressions that are related to the topic of this session in the comment form below.
  • You can make any examples of the English idioms and expressions and leave them as comments.
  • You are also encouraged to add further English idioms and expressions about the current topic as long as they are related.

Study the complete archive of English Idioms.

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13 comments on “English Idioms on Feelings and Emotions”

  1. Spaced out: not concentrating on what is happening around you because of tiredness or drugs
    Jim was totally spaced out after cleaning and ordering carpentry workshop.

  2. My favorite “take home” idiom was fall into place, I like to play with it in the following sentence:

    I believe that every effort I make in my life, will fall into place one day!

    Thanks!

  3. “Worked like a dream”
    To work or go extremely well, without any problems.
    • He let me drive his new car last night – it goes like a dream.
    “Up and running”
    “Functioning properly”
    • As soon as we can get the tractor up and running, we will plant the corn crop.
    “Fall into place”
    1. If parts of a situation that you have been trying to understand fall into place, you start to understand how they are connected with each other.
    • Suddenly, all details started falling into place.
    2. If parts of something that you want to happen fall into place, they start to happen in a way that you want.
    • I was lucky because everything fell into place at exactly the right time.
    “Looking up”
    If a situation is looking up, it is improving and getting better.
    • In this season everything is looking up.

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