1100 Words, Week 8, Day 2

1100 Words, Week 8, Day 21100 Words, Week 8, Day 2

1100 Words, Week 8, Day 2

?  Study this recorded class.

[embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R88AT-MmNU[/embedyt]


? New Words

Malnutrition: Noun

"malnutrition"/ˌmæl.njuːˈtrɪ.ʃən/ US /-nuː-/
noun [U]
physical weakness and bad health caused by a lack of food, or by a lack of the types of food necessary for good health:
Many of the refugees are suffering from severe malnutrition.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>malnutritionAfflict: Verb

"afflict"/əˈflɪkt/
verb [T]
If a problem or illness afflicts a person or thing, they suffer from it:
It is an illness which afflicts women more than men.
a country afflicted by civil war” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>afflictBesiege: Verb

"besiege"/bɪˈsiːdʒ/
verb [T often passive]
1. to surround a place, especially with an army, to prevent people or supplies getting in or out:
The town had been besieged for two months but still resisted the aggressors.
2. When someone is besieged, a lot of people surround them:
When the pop star tried to leave her hotel she was besieged by waiting journalists and fans.
3. to make many requests or complaints about something:
After showing the controversial film, the television company was besieged with phone calls and letters from angry viewers.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>besiegePrivation: Noun

"privation"/praɪˈveɪ.ʃən/
noun [C or U] FORMAL
a lack of the basic things that are necessary for an acceptable standard of living:
Economic privation is pushing the poor towards crime.
Several villages suffered serious privations during their long isolation during the war.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>privationSinister: Noun

"sinister"/ˈsɪn.ɪ.stəʳ/ US /-stɚ/
adjective
making you feel that something bad or evil might happen:
The ruined house had a sinister appearance.
A sinister-looking man sat in the corner of the room.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>sinister


? Words in Context

Dooley’s Mission

Aboard the refugee ship, Dooley’s destiny took shape. He became painfully Cognizant: Adjective

"cognizant"/ˈkɒg.nɪ.zənt/ US /ˈkɑːg-/
adjective FORMAL

Being aware of or conscious of something, having enough information or knowledge about something
Unfortunately, we were not cognizant of (= did not know about) the full facts.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>cognizant* of the Malnutrition: Noun

"malnutrition"/ˌmæl.njuːˈtrɪ.ʃən/ US /-nuː-/
noun [U]
physical weakness and bad health caused by a lack of food, or by a lack of the types of food necessary for good health:
Many of the refugees are suffering from severe malnutrition.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>malnutrition, disease, ignorance, and fear that afflicted the natives. In addition, he discerned* how active the Communists had been in spreading their anti-American propaganda. Tom Dooley pitched in to build shelters in Haiphong, and to comfort the Vietnamese there before that besieged city fell to the powerful Viet Minh forces. He was seemingly unconcerned by the many privations he had to endure. For his services, Dooley received the U.S. Navy’s Legion of Merit. He told the story of this exciting experience in Deliver Us from Evil, a best seller that alerted America to the plight of the Vietnamese as well as to the Sinister: Noun

"sinister"/ˈsɪn.ɪ.stəʳ/ US /-stɚ/
adjective
making you feel that something bad or evil might happen:
The ruined house had a sinister appearance.
A sinister-looking man sat in the corner of the room.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>sinister menace of communism.


? Sample Sentences

Use the new words in the following sentences.

  1. The stool pigeon, the detective’s Confidant: Noun

    "confidant" /ˈkɒn.fɪ.dænt/ US /ˈkɑːn.fə-/
    noun [C] (FEMALE ALSO confidante)
    a person you trust and share your feelings and secrets with:
    a close confidant

     ” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>confidant

    ,* told him about the Sinister: Noun

    "sinister"/ˈsɪn.ɪ.stəʳ/ US /-stɚ/
    adjective
    making you feel that something bad or evil might happen:
    The ruined house had a sinister appearance.
    A sinister-looking man sat in the corner of the room.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>sinister plot.

  2. By running up a white flag, the besieged troops indicated their desire to withdraw from the Fray: Noun

    "fray"An argument or fight.

    Three civilians were injured during the fray.

    verb [I]
    If your temper frays or your nerves fray, you gradually become upset or annoyed:
    Tempers frayed as thousands of motorists began the Christmas holiday with long waits in traffic jams.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>fray

    .*
  3. Citizens of several Kentucky mountain communities are afflicted by the worst poverty in the nation.
  4. The Emaciated: Adjective

    "emaciated"/ɪˈmeɪ.si.eɪ.tɪd/ US /-ţɪd/
    adjective FORMAL
    very thin and weak, usually because of illness or extreme hunger:
    There were pictures of emaciated children on the cover of the magazine.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>emaciated

    * prisoners were obviously suffering from advanced Malnutrition: Noun

    "malnutrition"/ˌmæl.njuːˈtrɪ.ʃən/ US /-nuː-/
    noun [U]
    physical weakness and bad health caused by a lack of food, or by a lack of the types of food necessary for good health:
    Many of the refugees are suffering from severe malnutrition.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>malnutrition.

  5. Albert Schweitzer endured considerable Privation: Noun

    "privation"/praɪˈveɪ.ʃən/
    noun [C or U] FORMAL
    a lack of the basic things that are necessary for an acceptable standard of living:
    Economic privation is pushing the poor towards crime.
    Several villages suffered serious privations during their long isolation during the war.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>privation as a jungle doctor.


✅ Definitions

Match the new words with their meanings.

  1. Malnutrition: Noun

    "malnutrition"/ˌmæl.njuːˈtrɪ.ʃən/ US /-nuː-/
    noun [U]
    physical weakness and bad health caused by a lack of food, or by a lack of the types of food necessary for good health:
    Many of the refugees are suffering from severe malnutrition.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>malnutrition ➡ faulty or inadequate diet

  2. Afflict: Verb

    "afflict"/əˈflɪkt/
    verb [T]
    If a problem or illness afflicts a person or thing, they suffer from it:
    It is an illness which afflicts women more than men.
    a country afflicted by civil war” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>afflict ➡ to trouble greatly, to distress

  3. Besiege: Verb

    "besiege"/bɪˈsiːdʒ/
    verb [T often passive]
    1. to surround a place, especially with an army, to prevent people or supplies getting in or out:
    The town had been besieged for two months but still resisted the aggressors.
    2. When someone is besieged, a lot of people surround them:
    When the pop star tried to leave her hotel she was besieged by waiting journalists and fans.
    3. to make many requests or complaints about something:
    After showing the controversial film, the television company was besieged with phone calls and letters from angry viewers.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>besiege ➡ to surround, hem in

  4. Privation: Noun

    "privation"/praɪˈveɪ.ʃən/
    noun [C or U] FORMAL
    a lack of the basic things that are necessary for an acceptable standard of living:
    Economic privation is pushing the poor towards crime.
    Several villages suffered serious privations during their long isolation during the war.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>privationLack: Noun

    "lack" /læk/
    verb [T]
    to not have or not have enough of something that is needed or wanted:
    He just lacks a little confidence.
    What we lack in this house is space to store things.
    We are lacking three members of staff due to illness.

    lack /læk/
    noun
    lack of sth the absence of something or when there is not enough of it:
    Her only problem is lack of confidence.
    Lack of sleep had made him irritable.
    If he fails it won’t be for/through lack of effort (= he has certainly tried).
    We won’t be going on holiday this year – lack of funds, I’m afraid.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>lack of necessities

  5. Sinister: Noun

    "sinister"/ˈsɪn.ɪ.stəʳ/ US /-stɚ/
    adjective
    making you feel that something bad or evil might happen:
    The ruined house had a sinister appearance.
    A sinister-looking man sat in the corner of the room.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>sinister ➡ evil, ominous


? Today’s Idiom

to Swap Horses in Midstream: Idiom

"swap-horses-in-midstream" in the middle of an activity, often one that is interrupted:
She interrupted him in midstream to ask a question.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>swap horses in midstream ➡ to vote against a candidate running for reelection, to change one’s mind

The mayor asked for our support, pointing out how foolish it would be to Swap Horses in Midstream: Idiom

"swap-horses-in-midstream" in the middle of an activity, often one that is interrupted:
She interrupted him in midstream to ask a question.” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>swap horses in midstream.

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